• 1,532

    Total Clients Represented
  • 359

    Family Law Clients
  • 980

    Immigration Clients
  • 150

    Veteran Clients

Serving the St. Louis area for over thirty years, our legal aid office ensures that clients are represented in court even if they are not able to afford a private attorney. Last year, we served 1,532 individuals by providing trauma-informed legal counsel to resolve civil matters and increase our clients’ quality of life. 

Our Immigration Law Department assists immigrants as they seek asylum, gain citizenship, reunite with family, and avoid deportation. 

Our Family Law Department advocates for domestic violence victims, protects the rights of abused or neglected children, and assists families in guardianship petitions. 

Our Veterans Advocacy Project works with marginalized veterans to resolve outstanding traffic tickets or warrants, barriers to drivers licenses, ensure veterans remain housed, and navigating community resources. 

Our Housing Law Department assists clients as they fight for their tenant rights and assists clients at risk of eviction.

 

Service Sign Up Info

CLAM cannot accept walk-ins. To request help, call 314-977-3993 on Tuesdays. It may take several weeks before you can speak with an attorney. You also can e-mail us:

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Pro Bono Assistance in Eviction Cases
August 01, 2020

As of August 1, rent and mortgage payments will be due, just as unemployment benefits and remaining federal and local . . .

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Remaining Housed During the Pandemic

Working together, our legal team was able to protect this woman from eviction, ensuring she had the time she needed to complete the process for CARES Act funds. Our staff attorney, Tiffany Norris, was able to negotiate with the landlord and the court to give Leyah more time to complete the CARES Act application, receive her funds, and pay the rent she owed to her landlord. She says, “As an attorney, I’m able to be a voice for my client who otherwise may be afraid to speak in intimidating situations, such as facing possible eviction from their landlord.” By ensuring the case was dismissed with prejudice, Norris made sure the landlord cannot re-sue Leyah for rent and possession in the future on the same case, and so that she is less at risk of future eviction.

 

*Names are changed to protect client privacy